Tag Archives: awe

Leviticus 22 – Priestly Laws

The priestly laws continue.  It must be hard to be a priest in Biblical times.  The rules and regulations you had to keep track of.  Some of them are obvious of course… like if you touch something unclean you will remain unclean until evening.  No leaper of the sons of Aaron may eat of the holy sacrifices, and while the family may eat, the married daughters may not eat unless she is divorced or widowed with no children and returns home to her father’s house.  It just seems like the laws and rules never end, but they are there for a reason.  An important reason.  Because someone needed to represent the people to YHWH, and YHWH to the people.

So the priests were responsible for the sins of the people and their relationship with YHWH.  They are the ones who placed their lives on the line day after day to make sure  that the people’s sins were covered.  They are the ones who had to do everything perfectly every day and every time.  They had to teach the people the precepts of YHWH.  It is their responsibility and their honor.  YHWH is a holy and a jealous God.  To serve Him day by day is an honor and a responsibility of a lifetime.

Do we take YHWH seriously, or do we just use Him as a rescue raft.  Do we worship the Holy God, or do we demand assistance from a galactic servant.  Do we pursue a relationship with Him in awe and wonder, or do we attempt to flippantly use Him for our advantage and advancement?  We are the servants of the Most High.  Maybe we need to start acting that way… if that’s alright with you.

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Filed under Application, Bible, Content, Leviticus, Old Testament, Project, Purpose, Torah

Genesis 28 – Response

Jacob is sent away to marry from Rebekah’s family.  He is given a proper blessing by his father, and instructed not to marry from the Canaanites around him.  I remember in Sunday School always being taught that Esau heard about this and ran off to marry a Canaanite woman to spite his father and mother.  I have also brought that presupposition into my previous readings; so i didn’t pay that much attention.

However, that doesn’t really seem to be the case. The passage says, “So Esau saw that the daughters of Canaan displeased his father Isaac; and Esau went to Ishmael and married” (NASB).  So Esau did not turn away, he simply attempted to fulfill his father’s wishes the only way he reasonably knew how.  He did not marry from the Canaanites, he married from his uncle Ishmael, just as Jacob was sent to marry from his uncle Laban.  It’s not hugely significant, but it’s one of the things that i have never really caught in the many times that i was just reading the passage through.

This chapter contains some interesting theological situations.  For instance, what is described here is a ladder or staircase from earth to heaven.  It is a connection point: a point at which heaven and earth almost touch each other.  It’s a point at which those in heaven have access to earth and those on earth have access to heaven.  Being a dream, I don’t know the extent to which this “stairway to heaven” is literal or figurative, but it does give you reason to pause and wonder how this occurs and how many other of these “stairways” might exist throughout the world.  I also don’t know how important this “stairway to heaven” is overall, but it is a unique feature of this chapter.

What IS more important though, is Jacob’s reaction to the situation.  Instead of ignoring the “dream”, or running away, or trying to rationalize it away, he comes to realization.  He was amazed, and he was afraid, and he was in awe of the situation and where he was; “How awesome is this place!  This is none other than the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.”  Beautiful isn’t it?  So Jacob turns around, sets up his pillow-rock as a pillar, pours oil over it, and calls the place Bethel or House of God.  Then he makes a vow to God that if He will be with him and take care of him, then Jacob will give a tithe (tenth) to God.

What is our reaction to God when He does something amazing?  What do we do when He shows up?  Do we run away, or try to ignore it, or rationalize it away, or try to justify ourselves; or do we fall in awe and wonder?  Do we, trembling, acknowledge God and make His truth a reality in our lives?  Do we pursue that God that we have had a personal experience with?  Do we take God’s truth into our very being and let it change who we are as a person?  Our reaction tells us who we really are.

 

John J. Camiolo Jr.

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Filed under Application, Bible, Content, Genesis, Old Testament, Person, Process, Purpose, Torah