Tag Archives: bread

Leviticus 24 – Holy to the Lord

“May your light never go out” – a blessing

YHWH gave a command to Aaron and Israel.  Never allow His light to go out in the tabernacle.  It was the priest’s job to keep the lamp in the tabernacle lit at all times.  His light is to shine in the darkness, never consumed or put out.  His light is to shine at all times and for all times.  It is a beacon of hope to the world.  It is holy to the LORD.

In the same way, the priest is to take fine flour and bake 12 loaves of bread and place them on the pure (gold) table in the presence of YHWH.  These 12 loaves are to be continually before him, to be eaten by Aaron and his descendants and then replenished every Sabbath.  They are holy to the LORD.

More than that, the Name of the LORD is holy.  When a man blasphemes the Name of the LORD, there are consequences.  It becomes a death sentence.  To dishonor the Name of the LORD is  to dishonor the LORD.  That cannnot be allowed in the camp and presence of God.  YHWH is not going to strike down every person who says something negative about Him, but He does expect His people to respond appropriately.  He is the LORD, and His name is Holy.

Do we treat YHWH and His name as holy.  Are we a light that never goes out, or are we on and off and on and off.  Do we point to the bread of life, or only to ourselves?

Leave a comment

Filed under Application, Bible, Content, Leviticus, Old Testament, Person, Project, Purpose, Torah

Exodus 16 – The Body

I’m beginning to understand more and more the qualities of a good pen.  I have gone through probably 5 different pens already.  Each of them has had a different work and feel to them.  I started out with a three pack of Pilot’s Varsities.  I had wanted to try out fountain pens for a while, but had never gotten around  to it.  They ran out of ink way too quickly, and the ink was so liquid that it would seep through the paper.  On the other hand, writing with them was scratchy yet smooth, and the writing was bold and vibrant.  That was a very good  thing.  Next i went on to an older gel pen that i had lying around.  It was not nearly as bold or vibrant, but overall the flow was smooth and not at all scratchy.  It was easy to write with, but the color definitely wasn’t strong enough.  When that ran out, i moved on to a decent quality ball point.  It was a bit more scratchy, the color was weaker, and writing with it was just a little bit more difficult, but overall it wasn’t overly uncomfortable to write with.

Now, I’m using what i can only describe as a cheap ball point pen that i picked up a while back.  The pen stock seems to be decent quality (it advertises a small college), but the ink and writing process is horrible.  At 32 i have hand and wrist problems that i suspect is from carpel tunnel ( i actually started noticing it at around 25).  Ultimately, the rough working of this pen is definitely irritating it.  The pen is not smooth at all.  It requires heavy pressure to get a good line, and it is not really comfortable at all.  I never really noticed just HOW different each pen is until i started on this project.

The Israelites had a different kind of body problem.  While mine has to do with pain while writing or typing, the Israelites problem stems from much more important bodily factors.  They were travelling through  the wilderness and had no (or very little) food  to eat.  How does a man like Moses go about feeding a million plus people?  The answer is that he can’t; so God has to do it.  So what does God do?  He provides them with bread from heaven.  The instructions are simple.  It shows up on the ground in the morning.  Each person gathers what he needs for himself and their family for the day, and at the end of the day it needs to be eaten up.  On the sixth day, gather enough for two days.  Such a simple concept, yet the people just can’t seem to get a grip of it.  Some try to hoard it.  Others leave leftovers for the next day.  Others don’t gather two days worth on the sixth day, and still others continue to complain.

It’s almost like this people have two things that they truly love; 1) complaining and 2) not listening.  God is providing for their physical needs, yet it still just doesn’t seem to be enough.  How about us?  How do we react when God doesn’t supply what we are looking for?

Leave a comment

Filed under Bible, Content, Exodus, Old Testament, Person, Process, Torah