Tag Archives: healing

Matthew 9 – Responses

As time goes on, Christ continues ministering.  It doesn’t matter where He is, or what He is doing, He keeps ministering.  However, as you will see, the people’s response to Him contrasts greatly.  A paralytic is brought to Him.  He tells him that his sins are forgiven, and not long after that, to get up and walk.  The scribes (educated folk) criticize him for the first thing, and the people were awestruck and praise YHWH for both.  Jesus eats with tax collectors and sinners.  The Pharisees criticize Him for mingling with the rabble.  Meanwhile, the tax collectors and sinners come to repentance.  John (the Baptist)’s  disciples critically question him about why they and even the Pharisees disciples fast, but Jesus’ don’t.  Jesus replies that now is not the right time.  If you expect too much from someone or something at the wrong time, you can destroy the work that needs to be done.

Day by day, people keep coming to Him, in spite of the scribes and Pharisees criticisms.  We actually begin to see deep contrasts in who and how people come to Him.  A synagogue official (public VIP figure) comes boldly to Him pleading with Him to heal and revive his dead daughter.  Meanwhile an unclean woman with an issue of blood comes to Him secretly hoping to get a scrap from the master’s table.  She wants to be healed.  While she comes in secret, He heals her publicly.  While the leader calls to Him publicly, Jesus heals his daughter in secret.

As He goes on and casts out demons, the religious leaders follow along with the gentile beliefs and decide that the only way for a demon to be cast out is if you send in a stronger, tougher demon to kick the first one out.  But then you end up with a different, stronger, demon to deal with.

Yet none of this matters to Jesus.  He feels compassion for the people for they are like sheep without a shepherd.  So, what’s His response?  That answer is in chapter 10.

John Camiolo

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Leviticus 23 – Celebrate

That’s one of the things that i like about YHWH.  It’s not all just about rules and regulations.  It’s about utilizing all kinds of aspects of life.  It’s about creativity and connecting the past, to the present, to the future.  Worship is not just about sacrifices and burnt offerings.  It’s also about bringing something before God that you are to consume in his presence.  It’s about festivals and rest as well.

There are a number of festivals that are to be celebrated throughout the year; the Passover, Pentacost, the feast of weeks, the feast of booths, etc.  They all have meanings and important interpretations.  For instance, passover is a celebration of freedom from bondage and slavery under the Egyptians.  It is a celebration of new life and hope.  It is a celebration of freedom.  Meanwhile, the feast of booths is a week long celebration in which the first day is a day of rest and the only work that can be done is the building of small booths made of the branches, boughs, and fronds of trees.  It is a celebration as a reminder of the Israelite’s time in the wilderness where they had to rely on God for protection and provision.  It is a time of blessing.  The feast of booths begins and ends with a day of rest to the LORD.  I mean honestly, how many religions do you know that celebrate rest?

Are we taking seriously what YHWH has done for us?  Do we make it a point to remember and celebrate together the ways that He has brought health and healing to our lives?  Do we remind one another and celebrate together His work and purpose in and through us?  How can we do this more?

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Leviticus 16 – Day of Atonement

Most of the sacrifices previously mentioned have been for the individual.  Whether it was a burnt offering, or a peace offering, or a wave offering, or a grain offering.  Each person would bring their sacrifice to the tabernacle to cover their own sins or for themselves and their families.  However, the day of atonement is different.

The day of atonement is very special in comparison to the other “daily” sacrifices.  The day of atonement occurs once per year on the 10th day of the seventh month of the Jewish calendar.  It is a time when all of the congregation of Israel was to get together at the tabernacle / temple for a special sacrifice for all.  The day of atonement is about bringing cleansing to the high priest and his family; to the tabernacle, alter and tools of worship; and to the congregation of Israel as a whole.  It’s about purifying and bringing all to right.  It’s kind of like rebooting or restoring a computer.  It cleans out the system and gives a fresh start.

This is very important over the succeeding centuries, and if it had been done and taken seriously as it should have been, it would have gone a long way to help prevent the corruption and downfall of the nations of Israel and Judah.  Yet it didn’t.

This principle still applies today.  While it is important for each individual to come to repentance before the LORD, and that seems to be a lost art.  Even more so the repentance of the nation.  How often do we take responsibility for the sins of the nation.  How often do we come to YHWH in worship of Him and seeking not only forgiveness and healing for our own sins but for those of our nation.  How often do we take responsibility for the decisions and direction of the nation.  It is something that the leaders of the nation especially are to do, but that the people of the nation need to pursue and take accountability for as well.  It is our nation and our responsibility.

Rev. John Camiolo

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Leviticus 13 – Leprosy

We are beginning to see more that God is not simply talking to Moses.  In the very first verse we see YHWH speaking to Moses AND Aaron.  As Aaron has begun to take on his new role as the high priest, we see God communicating with him as well as Moses.  There are more expectations of Aaron, while Moses continues to be the leader of the people.  He continues to lead and guide the masses, but Aaron begins to take on more and more important of a role in this infant nation.  That is a good thing.

As we move on from motherhood, we come to the next major topic for the law of the Levities.  So, who wants to talk about leprosy!?!  “Anyone, anyone?”  What, no takers?  You mean that leprosy isn’t an exciting, world changing subject?  Well, it certainly is to the one who has it!

Imagine being the person who wakes up one day to find the white mark in your hand or arm.  You wonder what it is, and you hope that it isn’t serious.  As the days go by you notice it more and more.  You try to ignore it, but there it is starting at you ominously.  Others begin to notice and tell you that you need to go see the priest.  You finally go, the priest looks at the mark and decides that you need to be isolated for a week.  So you are separated from your friends and family and everyone that you love waiting and hoping and praying for this mark to heal.  Meanwhile it is ever so slowly getting worse and you are stressed, panicked, and all alone.  You come before the priest, he looks over your wound and the rest of your body, and… you could be spending the rest of your days an outcast.  What do you do?

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Exodus 40 – Anointing Presence

The time has come for all the work to find completion.  The design and construction work have been completed and inspected, and now is the time for the assembly and final work to be done.  This appears to be a work that Moses, himself does, or in the very least that Moses directs.  He anoints it all with oil and puts everything together.  Piece by piece and part by part, the work gets done and the tabernacle is erected, “just as the LORD commanded him.

There is something fascinating to me about the process of anointing oil and anointing with oil.  I know that anointing oil and anointing with oil (among other things) are used to represent YHWH’s spirit being poured out as well as being anointed or consecrated for a work.  This is what is being represented here.  It is a preparation of these materials for the work that YHWH has for them.  They are set apart for a holy purpose, and somehow anointing them with oil helps to do this.

Anointing with oil is something that some churches and denominations do, and some do not.  It serves the same purposes, it is anointing in preparation of materials for the work of service.  It is also to set something / someone apart as holy for God’s use and purpose.  The third primary purpose of oil / anointing oil is for healing.  Oil used to be used to cleanse wounds to prevent infection and other problems.  As such, it is also used to represent the supernatural healing work of God’s Holy Spirit.  This can be physical healing as well as mental, emotional, and spiritual healing.  It’s a beautiful image of some of the work of the Holy Spirit.

Overall though, the real beauty of this chapter comes in the last verses of the chapter; “Then the cloud covered the tent of meeting, and the glory of the LORD filled the tabernacle.  Moses was not able to enter the tent of meeting because the cloud had settled on it, and the glory of the LORD filled the tabernacle.”  The work is completed.  The tabernacle has been anointed and erected, and now the reason and purpose of not only the work and the tabernacle but the very book of Exodus and the Bible is here.  The LORD… YHWH, and His glory (weight / presence) fill this place.  His is the true anointing presence.

Thus ends the book of Exodus.

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Exodus 30 – Incense & Anointing

What is the significance of scent, of aroma and of oils?  Why is it so important?  It seems to be important to the LORD, and in part i understand it.  Yet on the other hand i know that there is a part to it that i really just don’t grasp.  Scents can have a stressing or a calming effect on a person depending very much on what the scent is.  They can be irritating, soothing, or both at the same time.  In the major prophets when God is talking about the people of Israel, there are numerous times when He makes a statement similar to this; “Your sacrifices are offensive to my nostrils.”  Instead of being an aroma, pleasing to Him as is it’s intended purpose, it becomes noxious and vulgar.

Now, i can understand this to some extent as many strong perfumes and candles tend to give me headaches.  Also, at one point in my life when i worked as a cashier at a clothing store there was a regular customer who always made it a point to go through my line.  She appeared to be an older lady, and she would, whenever she had the chance, stop and talk with me for as long as she could.  It was kind of an uncomfortable situation under normal circumstances, but she also wore extremely strong and noxious perfume.  It was so bad that the majority of times, after talking with her for about five minutes or so, my head would be spinning so much i would have to lean on the counter to keep from falling over.

But that’s not what God was referring to when He spoke of their sacrifices being noxious in His nostrils.  He was referring to how the people would bring their sacrifices to the temple on the right days, but then would live as if YHWH meant nothing at all other times.  Their sins and offenses meant nothing to them as long as they came and made their appropriate sacrifices.  That is not how these sacrifices and incense are supposed to work.  They are supposed to enhance the sacrifice and make it more pleasing and acceptable to Him.

This chapter also deals with the anointing oil.  The anointing oil has been a fascinating thing to me.  It is used to consecrate and make holy.  It is used to define and explain the pouring out of the Holy Spirit.  It is used as a symbol of purification and for healing.  It is all of this and more.  In this chapter the anointing oil and the process of it being made is described in part.  Yet, it is still a mystery.  Some of the ingredients have been lost in time, or in the least their names have changed and we don’t know what they are anymore.  Even if we did know what they were, it would be easy for us in the church today (in our ignorance of God’s Holiness and the importance of His commands) to abuse its use and bring curses down upon ourselves.  For those same reasons i am glad that the true pronunciation of the name YHWH has been lost.

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