Tag Archives: sex

Leviticus 20 – Profane

Leviticus 20 parallel’s chapter 18 in most ways.  They both deal with those things that profane the people and the land.  They both respond to sexual sins and blatant ungodliness.  Both refer to the corruption of the nation through the corruption of the people, and that the very land itself will spew them out when their actions come out this way.

All of this is important for all people.  These are sins that cause the land to become unfertile and to reject its inhabitants, whether they be Christians, or Muslims, or Jews, or Hindu’s, or Buddhists, or Atheists, or Animists, any others.  When we pursue sexual immorality and spiritists, we will find time and time again that our nations will become more and more corrupt and that we will lose what we cherish most.

On a more positive note, in this chapter we come across a new name of God; YHWH Qadash.  YHWH Qadash appears in verse 8, and it means the LORD (YHWH) who sanctifies you.  It is a beautiful picture of how YHWH cherishes His people and sets them apart for Himself.  Those who are His children are blessed and honored by His name and His work in and through us.  We are pursued and set apart by the Most Holy God.  It is both an honor and a responsibility, and it must not be taken lightly.  It must not be profaned.

John

Leave a comment

Filed under Application, Bible, Content, Leviticus, Old Testament, Project, Purpose, Torah

Leviticus 18 – Defiled

This chapter is a very controversial chapter and tends to bring up all kinds of questions and debate.  In it YHWH deals with defilement (primarily sexual defilement); what defiles the people and what defiles the land.  In this chapter YHWH gives instruction for the people not to uncover their relative’s nakedness (or have sexual relations with them).  Incest is forbidden including incestual relations between a man and his mother, a father and his daughter-in-law, a man and both a woman and her daughter, and other relations.

There are other issues at work in this chapter as well.  For instance there is the command not to uncover a woman’s nakedness during her menstrual period, not to sleep with a neighbor’s wife, and not to sacrifice your child to Molech (this doesn’t happen anymore… does it?).  Each of these issues is very important and significant and should in no way be minimized.

However, the most controversial verse in this chapter (according to the current cultural view) is verse 22: “You shall not lie with a male as one lies with a female; it is an abomination.”  You can see where a big part of the controversy begins here.  There are many that say that this passage does not apply anymore due to Christ having fulfilled the law.  That since Christ came and died and was raised again, and the curtain to the most holies was torn, we are no longer bound by the law.  We do not have to fulfill the sacrificial rules and regulations because Christ became the perfect sacrifice.  Since this passage is part of the legal instructions given to the Israelite people, it is completed and fulfilled and no longer applicable to us.

To some extent, that is an accurate (albeit flawed) understanding of Christ’s fulfillment of the law.  This entire chapter holds a different kind of sway than most of the rest of the law.  It is true to some extent that the law was for the nation of Israel, but this chapter is about what supersedes that law.  Verses 24-25 explain this a little bit better:
Do not defile yourselves by any of these things; for by all these the nations which I am casting out before you have become defiled.  For the land has become defiled, therefore I have brought its punishment upon it, so the land has spewed out its inhabitants.
It doesn’t take an exegetical genius to understand that the commands in this chapter aren’t limited to the people of the Israelite nation.  These are laws that defy nature itself.  They are not limited to the people of Israel.  They apply to all people and all time.  It is because of these kinds of sins that the Israelites have the right, and the responsibility to not only conquer the land of Canaan, but to destroy its inhabitants as well.  The land itself has judged the Canaanites and is spewing them out because of the sins listed in this chapter.  The Israelites are simply tools to the fulfillment of that justice.

So how should we respond to those caught up in these kinds of sins?  Are we to judge and condemn them?  Is that our “right”?  I don’t believe so.  God says, “Judge not, lest you be judged.”  In that passage He is referring to not judging those of the world.  That judgment is His, not ours to dole out.  However, in I Corinthians 5 we are instructed to judge those within the body that are sinning against the body, and the sin refereed to there is a sin directly related to this chapter.  It was a sin being accepted and even praised within the church that should have been condemned.  That is a pattern we would be wise to heed.  The leaders of the church are responsible for understanding and responding appropriately to sin within the body.  In NO WAY should the church be lifting up and encouraging within the body what YHWH has condemned.  We are to be the light of hope to the troubled and struggling, not following in the defilement of the world.

1 Comment

Filed under Application, Bible, Content, Exodus, Leviticus, Old Testament, Person, Project, Purpose, Torah

Genesis 24-2 – Fulfillment

One of the things that i get annoyed with the way things are written in the Bible deals with the repetition.  A huge majority of what is written in the second half of this chapter is simply a repetition / retelling of exactly what happened in the first half.

On the other hand, it is good seeing the complete honesty and frankness with which the servant poses the situation to Rebekah and her family.  There is no mixing of words.  There is no skirting the subject.  There isn’t even any breaking it to the family slowly.  It is what it is, and all that the servant seems to care about is the fulfillment of the promise.  He has been sent on a mission.  He is going to fulfill the promise, and he is not interested in excuses, comforts, or delays.  Are we like the servant when God gives us a purpose / call / mission?  Do we, knowing that God sent us to do it, try to break it lightly to those affected by it, or do we go after it like an arrow from a bow?  Do we, like the servant, assume that because God has called us to do it, that He will make it happen, we just have to act?

I know that in many ways and many times i think more and long before i act.  I hear God telling me, and then i process it and think about it, and try to figure it out before i do it.  The servant’s focus was on fulfilling the promise and on nothing else.  I need to start doing that more.

The other thing that i wanted to note.  When Rebekah finally meets Isaac, there is a very different dynamic going on here in regards to marriage than that we see / understand in today’s world.  Isaac meets her, and the servant tells him the entire story.  Isaac then brings her into his mother’s tent, he takes Rebekah, and she becomes his wife.  There are some interesting implications here.  First off, the word for took is actually a compound word.  It is more literally self-taking, or taking her to himself.  So Isaac takes her into his mother’s tent, takes her to himself (intercourse) and thus she becomes his wife.

The very act of Isaac taking Rebekah was her becoming his wife.  We see the same concept in Genesis 2 “For this reason a man shall leave his father and his mother, and be joined to his wife; and they shall become one flesh.”  This was / is marriage.  The very act of sexual intercourse is the very act of marriage.  When a man and a woman have sex for the first time, they become one flesh, husband and wife.  There is no ceremony, there is no priest (other than God).  There is only man, woman, God, and the consummation or fulfillment.  Now husband and wife.

So what does this say of us?  How many times have we been married?  Do we have more than one husband / wife?  What now?

Leave a comment

Filed under Application, Bible, Content, Genesis, Old Testament, Person, Purpose, Torah