Tag Archives: wife

Leviticus 21 – Responsibility

Whenever YHWH sets a leader over His people, He sets up some pretty high expectations.  There are things that the people can do that the leaders must stay away from.  Those who act as priests, prophets, and kings are expected to live at a higher standard than those who do not have a direct connection and responsibility to YHWH.

In this chapter those of the priestly line and especially the priests who serve the LORD are instructed that they may not defile themselves by a corpse unless it is a direct family member.  Even then, the high priest may not even do that.  They may not marry a woman who has been widowed or divorced, or who has slept with any other man at any time in her life.  She must be a virgin or he may not marry her.  Nor may a priest tear his clothes in mourning or uncover his head.  If his daughter profanes herself in harlotry, it rests on him as well.  Then finally, if there is any physical defect in a man, He may not serve as priest before the LORD.  YHWH even goes so far as to say that if a man has a broken hand or foot, he may not serve the LORD.

Do we take our responsibility in representing the LORD seriously?  Do we set ourselves apart from the world, or do we do what everyone else is doing?  As people who pursue God and seek His work and will in our lives, we should be living examples of God and His work and will.  We should be truly pursuing Him in all holiness.

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Leviticus 12 – Motherhood

When i was in college and engaged to my wife, Lori, we were having Sunday dinner at her apartment.  It was Lori, her roommate, another friend (girl) from seminary, and me.  I’ll call this friend Karice.  So the four of us are all sitting around this little table together just hanging out and talking and the conversation slid idly over to the subject of kids.  Karice very excitedly look each of us in the eye and says, “Do you realize, we are all going to be mothers one day!”

As she says this i’m trying very hard not to spit milk out my nose or mouth from laughter.  After i finish swallowing i ask her a clarifying question; “So we are all going to be mother’s some day?”  In a very serious tone she says, “Yes, we are all going to be mothers some day!”  So i give it a few seconds to sink in, “WE are ALL going to be mothers one day.”  Karice looks at me like i am talking gibberish, and continues confused yet excitedly, “Of Course we are ALL going to be mothers some day.”  Meanwhile Lori and her roommate are both trying very hard not to break out laughing.  This goes on for another minute or so as Karice becomes more insistent and the rest of us are trying so hard not to break out laughing.  Finally Lori says to lost and confused Karice, “So John is going to be a mother some day too?”  It finally sinks in and Karice turns about 3 shades of pink darker as the bewilderment on her face quickly morphs into complete embarrassment, poor girl.

Eight years later and her prophetically spoken statement is 75% accurate.  I’m still not a mother, and i think that at this point it is safe to say that i probably never will be.  The three ladies in the room are all married with kids, and i am still the only guy in a place full of girls.

Motherhood is blessed.  It is not a thing of shame or to be disappointed about.  It is not dirty or unclean.  It is about faith, hope, and love embodied.  To bring new life in the world.  To share the joys and sorrows of life, and to pass down who you are to the next generation.

YHWH understands that… He created it.  Here in chapter 12 of Leviticus He tells the mother what needs to be done for her purification and return to communion with Him.  It is a beautiful promise given after a beautiful process of bringing about life.  The very work that YHWH has done and is continuing to do.

Blessed be the name of the LORD!

John J. Camiolo Jr.

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Genesis 28 – Response

Jacob is sent away to marry from Rebekah’s family.  He is given a proper blessing by his father, and instructed not to marry from the Canaanites around him.  I remember in Sunday School always being taught that Esau heard about this and ran off to marry a Canaanite woman to spite his father and mother.  I have also brought that presupposition into my previous readings; so i didn’t pay that much attention.

However, that doesn’t really seem to be the case. The passage says, “So Esau saw that the daughters of Canaan displeased his father Isaac; and Esau went to Ishmael and married” (NASB).  So Esau did not turn away, he simply attempted to fulfill his father’s wishes the only way he reasonably knew how.  He did not marry from the Canaanites, he married from his uncle Ishmael, just as Jacob was sent to marry from his uncle Laban.  It’s not hugely significant, but it’s one of the things that i have never really caught in the many times that i was just reading the passage through.

This chapter contains some interesting theological situations.  For instance, what is described here is a ladder or staircase from earth to heaven.  It is a connection point: a point at which heaven and earth almost touch each other.  It’s a point at which those in heaven have access to earth and those on earth have access to heaven.  Being a dream, I don’t know the extent to which this “stairway to heaven” is literal or figurative, but it does give you reason to pause and wonder how this occurs and how many other of these “stairways” might exist throughout the world.  I also don’t know how important this “stairway to heaven” is overall, but it is a unique feature of this chapter.

What IS more important though, is Jacob’s reaction to the situation.  Instead of ignoring the “dream”, or running away, or trying to rationalize it away, he comes to realization.  He was amazed, and he was afraid, and he was in awe of the situation and where he was; “How awesome is this place!  This is none other than the house of God, and this is the gate of heaven.”  Beautiful isn’t it?  So Jacob turns around, sets up his pillow-rock as a pillar, pours oil over it, and calls the place Bethel or House of God.  Then he makes a vow to God that if He will be with him and take care of him, then Jacob will give a tithe (tenth) to God.

What is our reaction to God when He does something amazing?  What do we do when He shows up?  Do we run away, or try to ignore it, or rationalize it away, or try to justify ourselves; or do we fall in awe and wonder?  Do we, trembling, acknowledge God and make His truth a reality in our lives?  Do we pursue that God that we have had a personal experience with?  Do we take God’s truth into our very being and let it change who we are as a person?  Our reaction tells us who we really are.

 

John J. Camiolo Jr.

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Genesis 24-2 – Fulfillment

One of the things that i get annoyed with the way things are written in the Bible deals with the repetition.  A huge majority of what is written in the second half of this chapter is simply a repetition / retelling of exactly what happened in the first half.

On the other hand, it is good seeing the complete honesty and frankness with which the servant poses the situation to Rebekah and her family.  There is no mixing of words.  There is no skirting the subject.  There isn’t even any breaking it to the family slowly.  It is what it is, and all that the servant seems to care about is the fulfillment of the promise.  He has been sent on a mission.  He is going to fulfill the promise, and he is not interested in excuses, comforts, or delays.  Are we like the servant when God gives us a purpose / call / mission?  Do we, knowing that God sent us to do it, try to break it lightly to those affected by it, or do we go after it like an arrow from a bow?  Do we, like the servant, assume that because God has called us to do it, that He will make it happen, we just have to act?

I know that in many ways and many times i think more and long before i act.  I hear God telling me, and then i process it and think about it, and try to figure it out before i do it.  The servant’s focus was on fulfilling the promise and on nothing else.  I need to start doing that more.

The other thing that i wanted to note.  When Rebekah finally meets Isaac, there is a very different dynamic going on here in regards to marriage than that we see / understand in today’s world.  Isaac meets her, and the servant tells him the entire story.  Isaac then brings her into his mother’s tent, he takes Rebekah, and she becomes his wife.  There are some interesting implications here.  First off, the word for took is actually a compound word.  It is more literally self-taking, or taking her to himself.  So Isaac takes her into his mother’s tent, takes her to himself (intercourse) and thus she becomes his wife.

The very act of Isaac taking Rebekah was her becoming his wife.  We see the same concept in Genesis 2 “For this reason a man shall leave his father and his mother, and be joined to his wife; and they shall become one flesh.”  This was / is marriage.  The very act of sexual intercourse is the very act of marriage.  When a man and a woman have sex for the first time, they become one flesh, husband and wife.  There is no ceremony, there is no priest (other than God).  There is only man, woman, God, and the consummation or fulfillment.  Now husband and wife.

So what does this say of us?  How many times have we been married?  Do we have more than one husband / wife?  What now?

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